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About Guerrilla Funk
Guerrilla Funk Recordings and Filmworks, LLC (GFR) produces original hard truth music and film projects. It serves as a vehicle for those who are unable - not because of lack of talent or relevance - to be heard in America's apolitical entertainment climate. With over 5 million records sold independently since its inception, GFR continues to enlighten and inspire. Please support the message & tell a friend!


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Public Enemy featuring Paris: Remix of a Nation

By James Shahan, www.urb.com


Let's be perfectly honest with ourselves: Public Enemy (or Paris for that matter) doesn't have to prove shit to anybody. To be able to say that you were able to shape an entire musical genre is no small feat. Yet today, since the majority of music's executive decisions are ultimately dictated by the ears of pre-teens, it seems as though truly good music in nearly any genre is being treated like audible vegetables. Sure they're good for you and help you grow, but kids would much rather shun such dishes for the instant gratification of fast-food music. Public Enemy is a heaping plate of greens and Paris has done a great job of serving them up with a twist. While not really the complete overhauls that is usually associated with the term "remix," there are still changes that are quite welcome. "Rise" is laced with a rather fitting saxophone solo this time around while "Can't Hold Us Back," an already on point song, is looking even better with an extended instrumental sequence after all is said and done (think black power call to arms meets James Bond). The only time when fans might fear for their favorite hip-hop powerhouse is when Chuck's vocals feel "loose" or uninspired (such as on "Hell No, We Ain't Alright" and "Watch the Door" respectively). While being small complaints, these moments are unfortunately frequent for an album with only 11 tracks. Regardless of its flaws, Remix of a Nation is sure to give listeners just what they were looking for: the fist-pumping, self-empowering anthems that are so desperately needed in hip-hop music.